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Beagle - Artificial Evolution and Computational Biology

Disciplines Computer Science, Biology
Research fields

Biology: Bioinformatics, Phylogeny, Molecular evolution, Comparative genomics, Genome assembly, Medical and biological imaging, Genome, Genomics, Evolutionary genomics, Genome dynamics, Genome rearrangement, Gene expression, Biochemistry, Cell biology, Microbiology, Neurobiology, Evolution, Animal experimental model, Single-cell experimental model: Bacteria

Physics: Dynamic systems, Ordinary differential equations, Partial differential equations, Stochastic methods, Monte-Carlo methods, Biophysics, Multiscale models, Network modelling

Computer science: Scientific computation, Simulation, Evolutionary algorithms, Neural networks, Individual-based models, Network modelling: Cell networks and Genetic networks, Artificial evolution, Artificial intelligence

Supporting organisms INRIAINSA de Lyon, UCBL
Geographical location INSA (LyonTech-la Doua)
Lab LIRIS, INRIA Rhône-Alpes
Team leader Carole Knibbe/Guillaume Beslon
Webpage https://team.inria.fr/beagle/

 

The expanded name for the Beagle research group is "Artificial Evolution and Computational Biology". Our aim is to position our research at the interface between biology and computer science and to contribute new results in biology by modeling biological systems. In other words we are making artifacts - from the Latin artis factum (an entity made by human art rather than by Nature) - and we explore them in order to understand Nature. Our research is based on an interdisciplinary scientic strategy: We are developing computer science formalisms and software for complex system modeling in synergy with multidisciplinary cooperations in the area of living sciences. Thanks to computational approaches we study abstractions of biological systems and processes in order to unravel the organizational principles of cellular systems.